Known for movies

Short Info

FactThe earliest historical record of Christopher Marlowe is the date of his baptism, which took place February 26, 1564, in Canterbury. Although the exact date of his birth is not known, children were traditionally baptized three days after being born.


Christopher Marlowe was born in Canterbury, England, on February 6, 1564. His father, John Marlowe, was a cobbler, and his mother, Catherine Marlowe, was a housewife. Christopher was the oldest of John and Catherine’s six children. Christopher’s siblings were Anne, Margaret, Thomas, Elizabeth, and John. Christopher’s early education was provided by his father and by the local vicar, Alexander Bainbridge. Christopher attended King’s School in Canterbury from 1579 to 1581. From 1581 to 1587, he studied at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.

Marlowe’s career as a playwright and poet began in 1587, when he wrote a play called Dido, Queen of Carthage. Dido was performed at the Rose Theatre in London in 1593. Marlowe’s other plays include Tamburlaine the Great (1587), The Jew of Malta (1589), Edward II (1592), and The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus (1604). Marlowe was also a translator of works by other authors, including Ovid’s Metamorphoses (1590) and Lucan’s Pharsalia (1594).

Marlowe’s career came to an abrupt end on May 30, 1593, when he was stabbed to death in a tavern brawl in Deptford, England. The exact circumstances of Marlowe’s death are still a matter of speculation. Some believe that he was killed by government agents because of his alleged involvement in atheism and espionage. Others believe that he was killed by rivals in the literary world.

At the time of his death, Marlowe was one of the most popular playwrights in England. His plays are known for their poetic language, dramatic action, and controversial themes. Marlowe’s influence can be seen in the works of William Shakespeare and other English playwrights.

General Info

NationalityBritish people

Social profile links

Facts

#Fact
1The earliest historical record of Christopher Marlowe is the date of his baptism, which took place February 26, 1564, in Canterbury. Although the exact date of his birth is not known, children were traditionally baptized three days after being born.

Pictures

Movies

Writer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Heartbox2016Short poem post-production
The Jew of Malta2012
The Ghosts of Faust2012Video play "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus"
Doctor Faustus2012
Faust1994play "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus"
La mort de Molière1994Video
Edward II1991play
Edward II1982TV Movie play
Il Fausto di Marlowe1977TV Movie original play
But Seriously, It's Sheila Hancock1973TV Series 1 episode
Edward II1970TV Movie play
Doctor Faustus1967play "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus"
The Deadly Affair1966play "Edward II" - uncredited
About Religion1964TV Series poetry and prose - 1 episode
Doctor Faustus1961TV Series play "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus" - 2 episodes
The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus1958TV Movie play
Telescope1947TV Movie
Edward II1947TV Movie play
The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus1947TV Movie play

Soundtrack

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Nancy LaMott: I'll Be Here with You2008Video performer: "Another Mr. Right", "Some Other Time", "The Blues", "I Love a Piano", "It Ain't Necessarily So", "The Darktown Strutters Ball", "Alexander's Ragtime Band", "Where Do You Start?", "Time After Time", "I'll Be Home for Christmas", "All the Things You Are", "I'm Glad There Is You", "I'll Be Here with You", "Out of This World", "So in Love", "Waters of March", "Moon River"
Charles Grodin1995TV Series performer - 1 episode
Richard III1995"Come Live With Me"
Good Morning America1993-1995TV Series performer - 2 episodes
Today1995TV Series performer - 1 episode
Live with Kelly and Michael1994TV Series performer - 1 episode
Come Live with Me1941lyrics: "Come Live With Me" 1599 - uncredited
The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex1939"The Passionate Shepherd to His Love Come Live With Me and Be My Love" posthumous 1599, uncredited

Source: IMDb, Wikipedia

Write A Comment

Pin It